Book Review + Mae West

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Wow, I’d love to walk through there!

5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn’t Put This Down!!!,January 19, 2012
By
Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

I absolutely LOVED this book. I got it for my Kindle and I just couldn’t put it down. For a first book this was well-written and brutally honest, which I really appreciated. I did not want this book to end, but after all the author had gone through, I couldn’t imagine one more bad event in her life. For someone who is struggling with sobriety this is an excellent account because, for me at least, there is so much I could relate to. I found myself cheering for the author every time she entered another treatment center, but even when she relapsed I sympathized with her because I know what it’s like. Yes, she had quite an attitude, but look at the reasons: she arrived to treatment nearly every time extremely intoxicated and not very happy about being there. Too add more to it, I really think that she was feeling very beaten down and deeply disappointed in herself and was afraid of another failure. I loved the fact that she never gave up on herself in the end.
I highly recommend this to anyone going through recovery or any friends or family of an addict!

*******

Thanks, Black Belt Mom!

Quote of the day:   Between two evils, I generally like to pick the one I never tried before. ~ Mae West

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One Out Of Five Stars + Princess Diana

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1.0 out of 5 stars A rough draft with possibilities (needs thorough editing), December 26, 2011
Miranda (Charleston WV)

If I hadn’t gotten this for free as an early reviewer I would not have finished it. I read a huge range of books, most are mediocre but a book has to be really bad for me to leave it partially finished.
The worst thing for me was that this could be a good book. The story is interesting and drinking memoirs are popular right now. A good, critical editor would have improved it, but as-is it reads like a rough draft with no editing. There are grammatical mistakes throughout the book and the writing is incredibly awkward. I read this on my Kindle and found a piece of text to highlight (for grammar, awkward wording, etc…) on a every page. There aren’t very many sentences on a Kindle page, especially given the odd formatting of this book.
Sometimes the writing is simply bad: “The mattress…had to weigh around a lot of pounds.”
But at other times it’s so poorly worded that it’s difficult to understand: “I took something that had nothing to do with me personally.” Did she steal something even though it meant nothing to her or did she become emotionally involved in something which had nothing to do with her? Of course you can figure it out from context but it never should have gotten past a halfway decent editor or 8th grade English teacher.
On one page the author writes “I needed to move to the PNW…” This is the first mention of this phrase yet she immediately uses initials. That’s quite the mistake but she compounds it a short while later with this passage “‘RJC’ She answered. …like I was supposed to know what those three letters stood for.” So the reader was supposed to automatically understand the author but when others do the same thing the author finds it offensive.
That is the other issue I had with this book – the author is extremely unlikeable. She makes snap judgements over trivialities – “Liar. He was a hair over 6’8″ and rounded up.” Estimating height to within an inch would be quite a talent. She harshly judges the behavior of other alcoholics as if it’s not an addiction and a disease while expecting her father to understand her behavior in terms of addiction (rather than a free choice). She includes odd descriptive details but does it randomly, as if she’s suddenly remembered that she should be descriptive.
I don’t think she *needs* to come off as likable, but if you’re not a sympathetic character then you need something else. Really fine writing, really good insights, or humor are good compensations (I don’t think Augusten Burroughs seems particularly likable but I love his books). This book has none of those compensations.
Again, this could be a good book. The author needs to take some writing classes, spend six months reading every decent memoir she can find and find a really tough editor who will help her improve her writing so that it reads like a finished book and not a rough draft.

*******

Duly noted, Miranda!   And now, a quote from a wise soul:

When you are happy you can forgive a great deal.  ~ Princess Diana

Woods + Benjamin Franklin Quote

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He that would live in peace and at ease must not speak all he knows or all he sees.  Benjamin Franklin
(I only wish I’d taken this picture.  It’s beautiful!)

My favorite US city + Faulkner

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Seattle snow – looks awesome!

 

A writer needs three things, experience, observation, and imagination, any two of which, at times any one of which, can supply the lack of the others. -William Faulkner, novelist (1897-1962)

Extraordinary Picture and Review!

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“A positive attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events and outcomes. It is a catalyst and it sparks extraordinary results.”
Wade Boggs

 

New! Nymtoc reviewed Saturation
Extraordinary November 15, 2011
Jennifer Place tells her own story and holds nothing back. “Saturation” is a hard look at a hard life. Through sheer determination, she made her way down long, ugly roads most of us never travel, and came out safe and sane at the end. The tough broads and eccentric jailbirds she meets belong in a movie. Many of the prison scenes are disturbing, but they show how much this gritty young woman went through before finding her way back to a more or less normal world.
~~~~~~~
Thanks Nym!
 

Great Barrier Reef + Quote by Henry Ellis

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Off the eastern coast of Australia.  ISS pic.

All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and
holding on.  ~ Henry Ellis

 

Long Island to Nova Scotia – From Space + Kant

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The master is himself an animal, and needs a master. Let him begin it as he will, it is not to be seen how he can procure a magistracy which can maintain public justice and which is itself just, whether it be a single person or a group of several elected persons. For each of them will always abuse his freedom if he has none above him to exercise force in accord with the laws. The highest master should be just in himself, and yet a man. This task is therefore the hardest of all; indeed, its complete solution is impossible, for from such crooked wood as man is made of, nothing perfectly straight can be built. That it is the last problem to be solved follows also from this: it requires that there be a correct conception of a possible constitution, great experience gained in many paths of life, and — far beyond these — a good will ready to accept such a constitution. Three such things are very hard, and if they are ever to be found together, it will be very late and after many vain attempts. ~ Kant